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Poppers, Alcohol and Other Drugs

Regardless of sexual orientation, most people, use one type of drug or another. Whether it’s cigarettes, coffee, energy drinks, steroids, anti-depressants, painkillers, alcohol, party drugs, or something else, here’s some tips to stay in control.

Chemsex Fueling Sexual Compulsivity

The powerful sexual arousal, commanding energy, and extreme sense of self lead the user to become powerless over their erotic temptation, sexual behavior, and drug use. Sex becomes a person’s prime means for validation, excitement, pleasure, and meaning which nothing else compares to, creating an irresistible urge to have one’s needs met.

The tragedy that ‘chemsex’ drugs can cause

In an interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Hendron has told how his partner’s death weighs heavily on his shoulders.

Last week, at the Old Bailey, Hendron pleaded guilty to two charges of possession with intent to supply Class B and Class C drugs. He will be sentenced in early May, with the judge telling him that “all sentencing options remained open”. BBC producer Alexander Parkin had earlier admitted two counts of supplying controlled drugs.

The After-Meth of Sex

Imagine a magic powder that transforms every potential lover into the person of your dreams. Now suppose every touch of that person feels like full-body orgasms for hours, and your hunger for them never ceases as long as you are under the spell.

Chemsex linked to rising levels of HIV among gay men

Increases have been recorded for HIV and sexually-transmitted infection transmission among ‘chemsex’ party goers where NPS and other drugs are taken over a prolonged weekend period. The parties are usually sex parties primarily between men who have sex with men.

Consolidated guidelines (UNAIDS 2014)

People at higher risk of HIV infection are not getting the health services they need, according to a new report by the World Health Organization entitled Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations.

Released on 11 July, the publication warns that failure to provide adequate

 

HIV services for key groups, such as men who have sex with men, people in prison, people who inject drugs, sex workers and transgender people, threatens the global progress of the HIV response.

The consolidated guidelines outline the steps for countries to take to reduce new HIV infections and increase access to HIV testing, treatment and care services by populations at higher risk. The report aims to provide a comprehensive package of evidence-informed HIV-related recommendations for all populations, increase awareness of the needs of and issues important to key populations, improve access, coverage and uptake of effective and acceptable services, and catalyse greater national and global commitment to adequate funding and services.

“Failure to provide services to the people who are at greatest risk of HIV jeopardizes further progress against the global epidemic and threatens the health and well-being of individuals, their families and the broader community.”

Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of the HIV Department at the World Health Organization


 

First published – July 11 2014